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dc.creatorMercieca, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-29T15:12:52Z
dc.date.available2019-08-29T15:12:52Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMercieca, Jennifer. “Ignoring the President: Barack Obama and the Postrhetorical Presidency.” Columns to Characters: The Presidency and the Press Enter the Digital Age, Texas A & M University Press, 2017, pp. 206–230.en
dc.identifier.isbn1623495628
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/177778
dc.description.abstractThe rhetorical presidency model made good sense within the traditional media market of the twentieth century, but makes little sense within the new media market of the new millennium. The era of the rhetorical presidency was characterized by a relationship between the presidency and the press that was reciprocal, mutually beneficial, and stable; the era of the post-rhetorical presidency is characterized by a relationship between the presidency and the press that is independent, competitive, and unstable. The post-rhetorical presidency began with the Bush Administration and flourished with the Obama Administration’s expert use of social and new media. Trump has only continued what his predecessors started.en
dc.publisherTexas A&M University Press
dc.subjectPresidenten
dc.subjectRhetoricen
dc.subjectRhetorical Presidencyen
dc.subjectPost-rhetorical presidencyen
dc.subjectBarack Obamaen
dc.titleIgnoring the President: Barack Obama and the Postrhetorical Presidencyen
dc.typeBook chapteren
local.departmentCommunicationen


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