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dc.creatorDworak, Jennifer
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:41:51Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:41:51Z
dc.date.created1998
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1998-Fellows-Thesis-D86
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: leaves 22-23.en
dc.description.abstractaWhenever integrated circuits are manufactured, a certain percentage of those circuits will be defective. Defective circuits present problems for both the manufacturers who wish to maintain a good reputation with their customers and the consumers who depend upon the correct operation of the products they buy. Thus, testing must be done to detect which parts are defective so that they are not sold to unwitting consumers. Most current testing methods involve generating test patterns that will detect single stuck-at faults. Unfortunately, however, the single stuck-at fault model cannot adequately describe all of the potential defects that may occur. The requirements for exciting a fault vary depending upon the specific model (stuck-at, bridge, etc.) being used, but the observation of the fault always requires that the erroneous logic value be propagated to a primary output. The proposed new method of automatic test pattern generation involves deterministically observing all of the sites in the circuit as many times as possible while randomly exciting the defects which may occur. This research demonstrates the importance of site observation on the detection of defects and shows some of the inefficiencies and shortcomings of the current stuck-at fault ATPG.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en
dc.subjectengineering I.en
dc.subjectMajor engineering I.en
dc.titleAn investigation of defect detection using random defect excitation and deterministic defect observation in complex integrated logic circuitsen
thesis.degree.departmentengineering Ien
thesis.degree.disciplineengineering Ien
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen


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