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dc.creatorWalker, Henry A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-17T00:48:21Z
dc.date.available2017-08-17T00:48:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/161184
dc.description.abstractThe author summarizes theories of equity and distributive justice that predict actors use legitimate distribution rules to act to maintain or to restore equity. He elaborates those ideas, distinguishing legitimacy based on validity (socially supported) from propriety (acceptance by the focal actor). Experimental research showed strong effects of both types of legitimacy on behavior, with validity having slightly stronger effects.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (SOC #7817^3<»), Morris Zelditch, Jr.» Principal Investigator. Computations were supported by a grant from the Office of the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research at Stanford University.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStanford Working Papers;85-3
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectInequalityen
dc.subjectValidityen
dc.subjectProprietyen
dc.subjectThird-Party Allocationsen
dc.titleWhen Inequality is Equitable: Validity, Propriety and Third Party Allocationsen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
local.departmentSociologyen
dc.identifier.doi1985


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States