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dc.contributor.advisorSuh, C. Steve
dc.creatorHalfmann, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-19T15:29:46Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-22T18:02:53Z
dc.date.available2012-10-19T15:29:46Z
dc.date.available2012-10-22T18:02:53Z
dc.date.created2012-08
dc.date.issued2012-10-19
dc.date.submittedAugust 2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-08-11416
dc.description.abstractExcessive vibrations continue to be a major hurdle in improving machining efficiency and achieving stable high speed cutting. To overcome detrimental vibrations, an enhanced understanding of the underlying nonlinear dynamics is required. Cutting instability is commonly studied through modeling and analysis which incorporates linearization that obscures the true nonlinear characteristics of the system which are prominent at high speeds. Thus to enhance cutting dynamics knowledge, a comprehensive nonlinear turning model that includes tool-workpiece interaction is experimentally validated using a commercial laser vibrometer to capture tool and workpiece vibrations. A procedure is developed to use instantaneous frequency for experimental time-frequency analysis and is shown to thoroughly characterize the underlying dynamics and identify chatter. For the tests performed, chatter is associated with changing spectral components and bifurcations which provides a view of the underlying dynamics not experimentally observed before. Validation of the turning model revealed that the underlying dynamics observed experimentally are accurately captured, and the coupled tool-workpiece chatter vibrations are simulated. The stability diagram shows an increase in the chatter-free limit as the spindle speed increases until 1500rpm where it begins to level out. At high speeds the workpiece dominates the dynamics, and excessive workpiece vibrations create another stability limit to consider. Thus, workpiece dynamics should not be neglected in analyses for the design of machine tools and robust control laws. The chip formation mechanisms and high speeds make micro-milling highly non-linear and capable of producing broadband frequencies that negatively affect the tool. A nonlinear dynamic micro-milling model is developed to study the effect of parameters on tool performance through spectral analysis using instantaneous frequency. A lumped mass-spring-damper system is assumed for modeling the tool, and a slip-line force mechanism is adopted. The effective rake angle, helical angle, and instantaneous chip thickness are accounted for. The model produced the high frequency force components seen experimentally in literature. It is found that increasing the helical angle decreased the forces, and an increase in system stiffness improved the dynamic response. Also, dynamic instability had the largest effect on tool performance with the spindle speed being the most critical parameter.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectMachiningen
dc.subjectInstantaneous Frequencyen
dc.subjectChatteren
dc.subjectBifurcationen
dc.subjectTurningen
dc.subjectMicro-millingen
dc.subjectHigh speed cuttingen
dc.subjectcutting instabilityen
dc.titleOn the Machining Dynamics of Turning and Micro-milling Processesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentMechanical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHung, Wayne
dc.contributor.committeeMemberPalazzolo, Alan
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWang, Jyhwen
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten


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