Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWaters, Michael R.
dc.creatorHalligan, Jessi
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T15:58:38Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T20:30:49Z
dc.date.available2014-09-16T07:28:21Z
dc.date.created2012-05
dc.date.issued2012-07-16
dc.date.submittedMay 2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2012-05-11002
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation addresses how Paleoindians used the karst drainage of the Aucilla River in northwestern Florida during the Pleistocene/Holocene transition (approximately 15-10,000 14C yr B.P.). I take a geoarchaeological approach to discuss Paleoindian land use by first defining the Late Pleistocene and Holocene geological record, and then by creating a model of site formation processes in the Aucilla River. Both underwater and terrestrial fieldwork were performed. Underwater fieldwork consisted of hand-driven cores and surface survey, vibrocoring, underwater 1 x 1 m unit excavation, and controlled surface collection. Terrestrial fieldwork consisted of shovel and auger test pits. Seventeen cores were collected from five different submerged sinkhole sites, which were used to select two sites for further study: Sloth Hole (8JE121), which had been previously excavated, and Wayne's Sink (8JE1508/TA280), which was recorded but not formally investigated. Five vibrocores and two 1 x 1m units were used, with previous research, to define the geological and geoarchaeological context of Sloth Hole. Fifteen vibrocores, six 1 x 1 m excavation units, and ten 1 x 1 m surface collection units were used to define the geological, geoarchaeological, and archaeological context of Wayne's Sink. A combination of 130 shovel and auger test pits was used to define the geological, geoarchaeological, and archaeological potential of the terrestrial landscape. Five new Holocene-aged terrestrial sites were recorded. All of these data were evaluated with archival data from previously-excavated sites to create models of site formation and Paleoindian land use in the lower Aucilla Basin. This research shows that there have been four major periods of sinkhole infill in the lower Aucilla basin. The first occurred prior to the Last Glacial Maximum, with each sinkhole containing peat deposits that date in excess of 21,000 calendar years ago (cal B.P.). These peats are overlain by sandy colluvium that dates to approximately 14,500 cal B.P. The colluvium is overlain by clays that contain evidence for soil formation. These soils vary in age, with radiocarbon dates of approximately 14,500-10,000 cal B.P. These clays are directly overlain by peats dating to 5,000-3,500 cal B.P., which are overlain by peats and clays that date to 2,500-0 cal B.P. Intact Paleoindian and Early Archaic deposits are possible in the late Pleistocene soils.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectgeoarchaeologyen
dc.subjectClovisen
dc.subjectAucilla Riveren
dc.subjectgeomorphologyen
dc.subjectterminal Pleistoceneen
dc.subjectPaleoindiansen
dc.subjectFloridaen
dc.subjectSloth Holeen
dc.subjectWayne's Sinken
dc.subjectunderwater archaeologyen
dc.subjectsubmerged prehistoricen
dc.titleGeoarchaeological Investigations into Paleoindian Adaptations on the Aucilla River, Northwest Floridaen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMorgan, Cristine
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGoebel, Ted
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHemmings, C. Andrew
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten
local.embargo.terms2014-07-16


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record