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dc.contributor.advisorBrossart, Daniel
dc.creatorBoulos, Sallie Ann
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T15:57:16Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T20:27:28Z
dc.date.available2012-07-16T15:57:16Z
dc.date.available2012-07-16T20:27:28Z
dc.date.created2011-05
dc.date.issued2012-07-16
dc.date.submittedMay 2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-05-9426
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this current study was to determine the role of acculturation, ethnic identity, and religious fatalism regarding attitudes towards seeking psychological help among Coptic (Egyptian Christian) Americans. In addition, differences between groups of gender and generational status, first-generation adult immigrants versus U.S.-born second-generation Copts, were analyzed. The study had a total sample of 91 individuals that self-identified as Coptic by race and/or Coptic Orthodox by religion, who voluntarily completed an anonymous online questionnaire. Results indicate that ethnic identity and acculturation are strong predictors of religious fatalistic beliefs, and those who identified as having more Arab ethnic identity and less assimilation to dominate culture have stronger religious fatalistic beliefs than those who identified with more western culture and an American ethnic identity. However, religious fatalism and ethnic identity were not significant predictors of attitudes towards seeking psychological help, and other variables such as stigma, language barriers, and skepticism of western psychology may be better predictors of attitudes towards seeking psychological help. Between groups comparisons identified subtle differences between males and females, and between first and second-generation Coptic Americans on acculturation, ethnic identity, and religious fatalism, but the groups were not statistically significant from one another. Clinical implications and directions for future research will also be discussed.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectCopticen
dc.subjectCoptic Orthodoxen
dc.subjectMiddle-Easten
dc.subjectMiddle-Easternen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectAcculturationen
dc.subjectEthnic Identityen
dc.subjectArab, Christianen
dc.subjectReligious Fatalismen
dc.subjectAttitudes towards seeking psychological helpen
dc.subjectOrthodoxen
dc.subjectEgyptianen
dc.subjectHealth Disparitiesen
dc.subjectHealth Seeking Behavioren
dc.subjectDeterminismen
dc.subjectLocus of Controlen
dc.subjectReligious Beliefsen
dc.subjectStructural Equation Modelingen
dc.subjectMultigroup Analysisen
dc.subjectFirst-generationen
dc.subjectSecond Generationen
dc.subjectImmigration.en
dc.titleThe Role of Acculturation, Ethnic Identity, and Religious Fatalism on Attitudes Towards Seeking Psychological Help Among Coptic Americans.en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDuffy, Michael
dc.contributor.committeeMemberElliott, Timothy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLeUnes, Arnold
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten


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