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dc.contributor.advisorPoston, Dudley L.
dc.creatorCherry, Robert Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-14T22:18:09Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-16T16:16:57Z
dc.date.available2012-02-14T22:18:09Z
dc.date.available2012-02-16T16:16:57Z
dc.date.created2010-12
dc.date.issued2012-02-14
dc.date.submittedDecember 2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-12-8665
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I investigate whether or not a series of social, demographic, and cultural factors affect fertility differently, in either direction or magnitude, for men and women. This work situates the study of male fertility within the existing demographic literature, models and compares male and female fertility through the use of a variety of dependent and independent variables, discovers which of those variables reveal a difference between the determinants of male and female fertility, and extends understanding of how male fertility should be studied in addition to and alongside female fertility. Although there is a significant literature on the biological and anatomic components of male fertility, there is little work published on the social and cultural factors that affect male fertility. Comparisons of male and female fertility are also lacking within the discipline of demography. The National Survey of Family Growth (Cycle 7) provides survey data on both men and women on a number of social, cultural, and demographic variables used either on their own, or as components in the construction of indicator variables. I present the results of models utilizing both direct and indirect measures of fertility. Three models are direct measures of fertility, and three other indirect models examine behaviors as a measure of exposure to the risk of fertility. Only four of these models were significant under the initial analysis. Within each of the models, the respondent’s age, poverty level, age at first intercourse, and whether the respondent ever married or cohabited presented the most frequent differences, in either direction, magnitude, or both, between males and females. I discuss the implications of the findings presented in the dissertation, as well as the potential for future research using other data or methods.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectfertilityen
dc.subjectmale fertilityen
dc.subjectdemographyen
dc.subjectindirect measures of fertilityen
dc.subjectdirect measures of fertilityen
dc.titleSituating Male Fertility: A Demographic Analysis of Male and Female Fertility in the United Statesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentSociologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSaenz, Rogelio
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcIntosh, William A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarlson, David
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten


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