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dc.contributor.advisorHuff, Gregory H.
dc.creatorGoldberger, Sean A.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-15T00:12:34Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T21:44:00Z
dc.date.available2010-07-15T00:12:34Z
dc.date.available2010-07-23T21:44:00Z
dc.date.created2009-05
dc.date.issued2010-07-14
dc.date.submittedMay 2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-05-535
dc.description.abstractCommunication and reconnaissance systems are requiring increasing flexibility concerning functionality and efficiency for multiband and broadband frequency applications. Circuit-based reconfiguration mechanisms continue to promote radio frequency (RF) application flexibility; however, increasing limitations have resulted in hindering performance. Therefore, the implementation of a "wireless" reconfiguration mechanism provides the required agility and amicability for microwave circuits and antennas without local overhead. The wireless reconfiguration mechanism in this thesis integrates dynamic, fluidic-based material systems to achieve electromagnetic agility and reduce the need for "wired" reconfiguration technologies. The dynamic material system component has become known as electromagnetically functionalized colloidal dispersions (EFCDs). In a microfluidic reconfiguration system, they provide electromagnetic agility by altering the colloidal volume fraction of EFCDs - their name highlights the special considerations we give to material systems in applied electromagnetics towards lowering loss and reducing system complexity. Utilizing EFCDs at the RF device-level produced the first circuit-type integration of this reconfiguration system; this is identified as the coaxial stub microfluidic impedance transformer (COSMIX). The COSMIX is a small hollowed segment of transmission line with results showing a full reactive loop (capacitive to inductive tuning) around the Smith chart over a 1.2 GHz bandwidth. A second microfluidic application demonstrates a novel antenna reconfiguration mechanism for a 3 GHz microstrip patch antenna. Results showed a 300 MHz downward frequency shift by dielectric colloidal dispersions. Magnetic material produced a 40 MHz frequency shift. The final application demonstrates the dynamically altering microfluidic system for a 3 GHz 1x2 array of linearly polarized microstrip patch antennas. The parallel microfluidic capillaries were imbedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both E- and H-plane designs showed a 250 MHz frequency shift by dielectric colloidal dispersions. Results showed a strong correlation between decreasing electrical length of the elements and an increase of the volume fraction, causing frequency to decrease and mutual coupling to increase. Measured, modeled, and analytical results for impedance, voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR), and radiation behavior (where applicable) are provided.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectArrayen
dc.subjectBarium Strontium Titanateen
dc.subjectCoaxen
dc.subjectColloidalen
dc.subjectDispersionen
dc.subjectEFCDsen
dc.subjectFrequency Reconfigurationen
dc.subjectImpedance Transformeren
dc.subjectMagnetodielectricen
dc.subjectMicrofluidicen
dc.subjectMicrostrip Patch Antennaen
dc.subjectNon-aqueousen
dc.subjectPDMSen
dc.subjectPerturbationen
dc.subjectReconfigurableen
dc.subjectReconfigurable Antennaen
dc.subjectReconfiguration Mechanismen
dc.subjectRFen
dc.subjectRadio Frequencyen
dc.subjectStrontium Hexaferriteen
dc.subjectStuben
dc.subjectSurfactanten
dc.subjectTransmission Lineen
dc.subjectVascularen
dc.titleA Study of Microfluidic Reconfiguration Mechanisms Enabled by Functionalized Dispersions of Colloidal Material for Radio Frequency Applicationsen
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberNevels, Robert D.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberChang, Kia
dc.contributor.committeeMemberOrville, Richard
dc.type.genreElectronic Thesisen
dc.type.materialtexten


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