Show simple item record

Visit the Energy Systems Laboratory Homepage.

dc.creatorFraley, L. D.
dc.creatorKsiao, H. K.
dc.creatorThunem, C. B.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-23T18:08:09Z
dc.date.available2011-04-23T18:08:09Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-84-04-51
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94694
dc.description.abstractNot too many years ago energy costs and efficiencies were virtually ignored by corporate decision makers. The prevailing attitude was 'my business is manufacturing and my capital is best spent improving and expanding my manufacturing capacity.' With energy now contributing a significant fraction of the overall product cost in many industries, there is general recognition that control of fuel and electric costs is just as important to remaining competitive as is improving manufacturing methods. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners, the industry has reduced the fuel requirement per ton of cement from about 7 million Btu per ton in old plants to less than 3 million Btu per ton in the most modern plants.en
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)
dc.subjectWaste Heat Recoveryen
dc.subjectCement Manufacturingen
dc.subjectFluidized Bedsen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Regulationsen
dc.subjectFuel Savingsen
dc.titleWaste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Bedsen
dc.contributor.sponsorM.W. Kellogg, R&D Center
dc.contributor.sponsorStanley Consultants, Inc.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record