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dc.creatorSvoboda, K. J.en_US
dc.creatorKlooster, H. J.en_US
dc.creatorJohnnie, D. H., Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-14T16:48:53Z
dc.date.available2011-04-14T16:48:53Z
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-83-04-55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94576
dc.description.abstractHistorically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking advantage of seasonal wet bulb temperature fluctuations. The maximum plant output occurs at the average winter wet bulb temperature. Floating cooling is especially suited to base load power plants located in regions with large daily and seasonal wet bulb temperature variations. An example for a geothermal power plant is included in this paper.en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.subjectFloating Cooling Systemsen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Consumptionen_US
dc.subjectGeothermal Power Planten_US
dc.titleThe Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systemsen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorFluor Engineers Inc.en_US


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