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dc.creatorRusnak, J. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-11T15:35:17Z
dc.date.available2011-04-11T15:35:17Z
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-81-04-126en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94388
dc.description.abstractMeters don't save energy' This statement has often concluded a meeting or terminated a budget request leaving the metering proponent feeling frustrated. Such a statement is technically correct when meters are evaluated in the same way as equipment that provides direct and measureable savings. It does little, however, for the engineer or manager who feels shackled by the lack of data to control his energy conservation program. This paper investigates a number of ways that meters are used to provide energy savings. Some are direct savings that can be quantified; others are indirect savings that result from better management control of energy resources. The foundation for this paper was a series of interviews with energy managers from several large U.S. industrial firms.en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.subjectMetersen_US
dc.subjectDirect and Indirect Energy Savingsen_US
dc.subjectJustificationen_US
dc.titleYou Can Justify Meters for Your Energy Conservation Programen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorEngineering Measurements Companyen_US


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