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dc.creatorMcCall, R.en_US
dc.creatorBickle, L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T19:04:25Z
dc.date.available2011-04-07T19:04:25Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-82-04-93en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94349
dc.description.abstractWith proper management of energy conservation programs, any structure can be energy efficient. And this energy efficiency need not require great expenditures. A 'systems approach' to energy management identifies a series of activities which results in a cost effective, overall reduction in energy consumption. An energy management program should begin with inexpensive changes in administrative policies. There's a right way and a wrong way to use a building; how it's used can materially affect energy consumption. A statement of goals, clear definition of accountability, and a meaningful method of evaluating progress can produce remarkable energy savings with payback times measured in months. The accumulated savings from changes in administrative policies then pay for progressively more expensive improvements in operations and maintenance. Ultimately, the savings generated by many no- or low-cost actions begin to pay for capital improvements. The remainder of this paper will illustrate how energy conservation management techniques have been economically applied to a variety of buildings.en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.subjectEnergy Conservation Programsen_US
dc.subjectProgram Organizationen_US
dc.subjectStrategiesen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Savingsen_US
dc.titleEnergy Conservation Management Can Pay For Itselfen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorThe CRS Group, Inc.en_US


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