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dc.creatorWells, T. A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T19:03:26Z
dc.date.available2011-04-07T19:03:26Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-82-04-126en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94241
dc.description.abstractThe previous generations of olefin units were typically importers of utilities such as high pressure steam and electricity. But, in the new generation of units, diligent energy conservation efforts have reduced the high pressure steam demand to the point where waste heat from pyrolysis generates more than enough steam to power the olefins unit recovery section. Furthermore, incorporating gas turbine driven electrical generators or process compressors adds to the utility export potential of the unit. It is necessary, therefore, to consider utility export as a valuable byproduct of olefins production and incorporate it within the utility network of the petrochemical complex. As with any byproduct of a process, it is necessary to be able to control its production and distribution.en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.subjectOlefin Unitsen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Managementen_US
dc.subjectCombustion Air Preheatingen_US
dc.subjectGas Turbine Applicationsen_US
dc.titleEnergy Management in Olefins Unitsen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorM.W. Kelloggen_US


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