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dc.creatorSchmeal, W. R.
dc.creatorHibbs, J. J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-28T17:12:26Z
dc.date.available2010-07-28T17:12:26Z
dc.date.issued1994-04
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-94-04-55
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/91931
dc.description.abstractThree new factors are coming together to motivate gas pipeline firms to consider electric motors for replacement of older reciprocating gas engines for compressor systems, and for new compressor installations. These factors are environmental regulations, economics, and new compressor technology. In ozone Non-Attainment regions, it is necessary to bring gas compressors into compliance with NOx regulations, and replacement with new electric systems represents a Lowest Achievable Emission Rate (LAER) option. Outside of these regions, new electric drives as well as gas fueled reciprocating engines and turbines are being considered for replacement of older reciprocating gas engines and compressor units, based on improved operating efficiency. We review here the impacts of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and economics on the selection process for considering electric drives versus alternatives for both ozone Non-Attainment areas and Attainment areas.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en
dc.subjectCompressor Systemsen
dc.subjectElectric Drivesen
dc.titleEconomics of Electric Compressors for Gas Transmissionen
dc.typePresentationen


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