Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDooley, Kim E.
dc.contributor.advisorLindner, James R.
dc.creatorYakah, Jemima Abena
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-30T23:27:36Z
dc.date.available2006-10-30T23:27:36Z
dc.date.created2005-08
dc.date.issued2006-10-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4264
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine faculty perceptions about factors impacting the adoption and diffusion of Web-Based Educational Technologies (WBETs) at the University of Cape Coast and the University of Ghana, Legon. This study, based on Rogers’ theory of adoption and diffusion, is a modified replication of a study by Li (2004), in the context of Ghana. Data were collected with a modified instrument created by Li (2004), from 61 teaching faculty out of a target accessible population of 200. The instrument comprised of four sections: The first, was used to collect data about faculty stage in the innovation development process. The second was used to collect data describing five attributes (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability) impacting the adoption and diffusion of WBETs. The third was used to collect data about ten barriers (concerns about time, concerns about incentives, program credibility, financial concerns, planning issues, conflict with traditional education, fear of technology, technical expertise, administrative support, and infrastructure) impacting the adoption and diffusion of WBETs. The fourth section was used to collect data on personal characteristics of the faculty. Descriptive, correlational and regression analyses were used to examine relationships between faculty personal characteristics, stage in the innovation-decision process, and perceptions of attributes and barriers impacting the adoption and diffusion of WBETs. From the descriptive results, respondents perceived ‘relative advantage’ and ‘observability’ as the two most important attributes that impact the adoption and diffusion of WBETs. Infrastructure, financial concerns, and technical expertise were perceived as posing moderate to strong barriers to the adoption and diffusion of WBETs. Only compatibility (attribute) and technical expertise (barrier) had statistically significant correlations with faculty stage in the innovation decision process. The attributes and barriers altogether explained only 10.6% and 17.3% respectively of faculty stage in the innovation-decision process. Of the eight personal characteristics examined, only ‘experience with WBETs’ had a statistically significant correlation with faculty stage in the innovation-decision process. Recommendations to administrators and policy makers include allocating investments and resources that promote attributes and eliminate barriers, and conduct further research into factors that affect the adoption and diffusion of WBETs.en
dc.format.extent1334449 bytesen
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University
dc.subjectAdoptionen
dc.subjectDiffusionen
dc.subjectBarriersen
dc.subjectAttributesen
dc.subjectGhanaen
dc.subjectCape Coasten
dc.subjectRogersen
dc.subjectEducational Technologiesen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subjectMDGsen
dc.subjecten
dc.titleFaculty perceptions about attributes and barriers impacting the adoption and diffusion of Web-Based Educational Technologies (WBETs) at the University of Cape Coast and the University of Ghana, Legonen
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJones, Eluned
dc.type.genreElectronic Thesisen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record