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dc.contributor.advisorTownsend, Christine
dc.creatorCarbajal, Virginia Isabel
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-16T19:07:59Z
dc.date.available2006-08-16T19:07:59Z
dc.date.created2003-05
dc.date.issued2006-08-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3890
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the initial and actual professional goals, the changes in initial and actual professional goals and the reasons for this change of the different Texas A&M University veterinary medicine graduates from 1990-2002, how satisfied the selected veterinary medicine graduates were with their veterinary medicine college educational preparation from the graduating classes representing 1990-2002, and to determine if the top ranked courses have changed among the veterinary medicine graduates from 1990 until 2002. The descriptive research design included a questionnaire that was provided to Texas A&M University’s College of Veterinary Medicine graduates one year following graduation. Data was collected from the group of veterinarians who graduated during 1990-2002. Findings indicate that since 1990, veterinary students have entered the College of Veterinary Medicine with a predominant interest in small animal or mixed practices. This study shows the stability of the career choices with mixed and small being consistently the first and second choices over the span of years studied. No apparent trend appeared from the data that identifies one compelling reason for changing jobs. The overall satisfaction for the educational preparation on their education is 90% or more. The top-ranked basic science courses have not changed among the veterinary medicine graduates during the selected period and these are: “Pharmacology,” “Gross Anatomy,” “Endocrine,” “Parasitology,” “Physiology” and “Clinical Pathology.” The top-ranked clinical disciplines are not as clearly ranked as the basic sciences. They are: “Anesthesiology,” “Gastroenterology,” “General Surgery,” “Internal Medicine,” “Oncology,” and “Radiology.” No apparent trend appeared from the data that identifies one or the other of these categories becoming more popular over time.en
dc.format.extent786696 bytesen
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University
dc.subjectVeterinary Educationen
dc.subjectAssessment Educational Preparationen
dc.subjectAssessment Educationen
dc.titleAn asessment of the educational preparation of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine graduatesen
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBoyd, Barry
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGage, E. Dean
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBriers, Gary
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen


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