Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorNash, William R.en_US
dc.creatorMaier, Herbert N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-29T14:42:10Z
dc.date.available2005-08-29T14:42:10Z
dc.date.created2003-05en_US
dc.date.issued2005-08-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2453
dc.description.abstractA training method utilized in a few martial arts was found to agree strongly with current cognitive psychology theory. Further study extracted a procedural model for learning a complex set of whole-body, dyadic motor skills involving high-speed, interactive, continuous situation assessment and decision making. A broader literature survey found relevance in several fields of research, supporting the definition of four performance dimensions in the activity. Data collected from one experienced student partnering with each of ten students of various experience levels was analyzed on these four dimensions. These dimensions were found sufficient to show both individual differences and changes across an instructional intervention. Strong correlations found under linear regression were supportive of anecdotal evidence from the model??s long empirical history in training. Data provided evidence of a self-organizing dynamic emerging from the interaction of a dyad participating in this activity, and of individual differences in cognitive resource management dynamically setting allocation priorities among specific aspects of a complex motor/cognitive activity. Highly individual responses demonstrate a mechanism for insight into students that are difficult to read. Numerous comparisons and contrasts show interactivity of performance dimensions. Impact is foreseen for research, training and testing in motor learning fields, as well as situation awareness, decision making and military tactical training. Further research is recommended to replicate these findings, test hypotheses derived from them, and to extend testing of the drill-network model into other fields of learning.en_US
dc.format.extent2071245 bytes
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.subjectmartial arts cognitionen_US
dc.subjecttactical cognitionen_US
dc.subjectcognitive load dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectself-organizationen_US
dc.subjectsituation awarenessen_US
dc.subjectdyad trainingen_US
dc.subjectcognitive strategiesen_US
dc.subjectrandom practiceen_US
dc.subjectnaturalistic decision makingen_US
dc.subjectinitiativeen_US
dc.subjectdynamical systemen_US
dc.titleMeasuring cognitive load management in a traditional martial arts training modelen_US
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWright, David L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJuntune, Joyce E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHall, Robert J.en_US
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record