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dc.contributor.advisorO'Farrell, Mary Ann
dc.creatorCantrell, Samantha E.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-29T14:36:12Z
dc.date.available2005-08-29T14:36:12Z
dc.date.created2003-05
dc.date.issued2005-08-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/2226
dc.description.abstractA repeated theme in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson is the use of domestic space as a tool for defining socially acceptable versions of female sexuality. Four novels that crystallize this theme are the focus of this dissertation: Winterson??s Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (1985) and Art and Lies (1994) and Carter??s The Magic Toyshop (1967) and Nights at the Circus (1984). Each chapter examines both authors?? treatments of a specific room in the house. Chapter II, "Parlor Games: Spatial Literacy in Formal Rooms," discusses how rooms used for formal occasions project a desirable public image of a family. More insidiously, however, the rooms protect the sexual order of the household, which often privileges male sexuality. Using the term spatial literacy to describe how characters interpret rooms, the chapter argues that characters with a high spatial literacy can detect not only the overt messages of these formal rooms, but also what underlies those messages. Chapter III, "Making Meals, Breaking Deals: Mothers, Daughters, and Kitchens," discusses the kitchen as the site of the production of domestic comfort. An analysis of who has primary responsibility for the production of comfort and whose comfort is privileged often reveals the power hierarchy of a given household. The chapter also examines the kitchen as a volatile space that can erupt with violence and the expression of repressed emotions and repressed sexuality. Finally, the kitchen is analyzed as a space of intimacy between mothers and daughters. Chapter IV, "Bedtime Stories: Assaulting Sexuality in the Bedroom," argues that the privacy of the adolescent bedroom is often disrupted by the surveillance of family members trying to control the sexual identity of the room??s occupant. The chapter also examines how social prescriptions encourage women to tolerate the interruption of their privacy. Each of the protagonists from these four novels has opportunities to learn about subverting the discursive constructions of domestic space, and several characters enact that subversion. This ability for subversion suggests the possibility for agency, a possibility that postmodernist thought often rejects, but one that Carter and Winterson allow.en
dc.format.extent617541 bytesen
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University
dc.subjectAngela Carteren
dc.subjectJeanette Wintersonen
dc.subjectOranges Are Not the Only Fruiten
dc.subjectArt and Liesen
dc.subjectNights at the Circusen
dc.subjectThe Magic Toyshopen
dc.subjectdomestic spaceen
dc.subjectsexualityen
dc.titleHousing sexuality: domestic space and the development of female sexuality in the fiction of Angela Carter and Jeanette Wintersonen
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMcWhirter, David
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEide, Marian
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHawthorne, Melanie
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMatthews, Pamela
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen


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