Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Lori
dc.creatorVarghese, Justin Sunny
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-23T18:07:23Z
dc.date.created2021-05
dc.date.issued2021-04-16
dc.date.submittedMay 2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/195693
dc.description.abstractThis study included several research objectives, assessed through data collected by an online survey from supervisees at Southwest Association of College University Housing Officers member organizations. Included is a presentation of supervisee and supervisor demographics from the perspective of supervisees (e.g., ethnicity/race, staff position, age, gender, meeting frequency, length of time at institution and time spent working together). Additional objectives were as follows. Demographic variables were examined in relation to the Short Supervisory Relationship Questionnaire, which measures the quality of the supervisory relationship, and to the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which assesses leadership style. Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression were used to determine statistical significance. The sample comprised 56 male and 67 female supervisees, and 62 male and 65 female supervisors. The average age of the supervisees was 35.73 years old, compared to 43.75 years old for the supervisors. Almost all supervisors and supervisees were White. Most supervisors and supervisees were in a position of leadership; the average length of time worked together was 6 years, and most reported weekly supervisor meetings. The highest average Short Supervisory Relationship Questionnaire subscale was safe base, and the lowest was structure, which indicates that these supervisors provide a safe base for supervisees to share opinions and beliefs, though they are not always organized, and there may be a lack of accountability in working relationships. For the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, high scores were found for transactional leadership in terms of inspirational motivation while low scores were obtained for individual consideration, contingent reward, and management by exception-passive. Overall, levels of transactional leadership were low. Meeting frequency was significantly related to the quality of the supervisory relationship; supervisees with infrequent supervisory meeting had lower Short Supervisory Relationship Questionnaire total, safe base, and reflective education scores. Daily meetings were associated with increased reflective education. For supervisor position, only leadership or entry-level were significant predictors of Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire styles, but only for transactional and passive-avoidant. The foundational knowledge provided by this study may be useful when designing development programs for supervisors that are meant to promote productive, mutually beneficial supervisory relationships.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectsupervisory relationshipen
dc.subjectleadership stylesen
dc.subjectsupervisoren
dc.subjectsuperviseeen
dc.subjectstudent affairsen
dc.subjectstudent housingen
dc.subjectMLQen
dc.subjectSRQen
dc.subjectSSRQen
dc.titleSUPERVISORY RELATIONSHIPS AND LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORS WITHIN STUDENT AFFAIRS: PERCEPTIONS OF SUPERVISEESen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentAgricultural Leadership, Education, and Communicationsen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Leadership, Education, and Communicationsen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBriers, Gary
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDooley, Kim
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWelch, Ben
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.date.updated2022-02-23T18:07:24Z
local.embargo.terms2023-05-01
local.embargo.lift2023-05-01
local.etdauthor.orcid0000-0003-1075-2196


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record