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dc.contributor.advisorHarvey, Idethia
dc.contributor.advisorGuidry, Jeffrey
dc.creatorBonner, Timethia Jamille
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-28T17:35:58Z
dc.date.available2020-02-28T17:35:58Z
dc.date.created2015-12
dc.date.issued2015-10-28
dc.date.submittedDecember 2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/187471
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation presents three separate studies developed to provide structure and evidence-based insight into the characteristics associated with short term and long term foot self-care investments of African Americans living with type 2 diabetes. First, a systematic literature review of thirty-four empirical studies on foot care knowledge and foot self-care interventions in people living with type 2 diabetes will be presented to determine where further interventions and research are needed in foot care. Secondly, a qualitative examination of common sense associations of lower extremity disease will be presented. Employing an emergent design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with African Americans with type 2 diabetes. The final sample size comprised 12 individuals. The Self-Regulatory Model of Illness Representations was proposed to assist in interpreting the qualitative findings and to theorize factors associated with making common sense assumptions about type 2 diabetes risks and disease progression. Lastly, a quantitative examination of foot care knowledge using a previously validated foot care questionnaire will be discussed. Qualtrics (Provo, Utah) served as the host site for both pilot- and final testing phases of the questionnaire, but hard copies of the questionnaire were also distributed to participants. The final sample comprised a convenience and snowball sample of African Americans living with type 2 diabetes. Principal components analysis identified six subscales with satisfactory internal consistency (alpha = 0.77-0.91). Prior to this study, very few interventions were available addressing foot care knowledge and self-care skills within African Americans with type 2 diabetes, very few studies were available that attempted to understand common sense associations of illness representations in African Americans with type 2 diabetes, and there was no standardized instrument for measuring foot care knowledge and foot self-care among people with type 2 diabetes, despite the devastating effects lower extremity complications have on quality of life. Thus, this study attempts to address the limitations associated with foot care knowledge and foot self-care skills research and interventions.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectAfrican Americanen
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetesen
dc.subjectfoot careen
dc.subjectdiabetic foot care knowledgeen
dc.titleExamination of Foot Care Knowledge among African Americans Living with Type 2 Diabetesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentHealth and Kinesiologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineHealth Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCarter, Akilah
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSherman, Ledric
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKelly, Brandy
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.date.updated2020-02-28T17:35:58Z
local.etdauthor.orcid0000-0001-6168-0095


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