Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHoagwood, Terence A.en_US
dc.creatorTerry, Gina Opdyckeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-08T22:47:42Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-09T01:33:33Z
dc.date.available2011-08-08T22:47:42Zen_US
dc.date.available2011-08-09T01:33:33Z
dc.date.created2010-05en_US
dc.date.issued2011-08-08en_US
dc.date.submittedMay 2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-05-7762en_US
dc.description.abstract"Image and Text" focuses on the consequences of multi-media interaction on the concept of a work's meaning(s) in three distinct publishing trends in nineteenth-century Britain: graphic satire, the literary annuals, and book illustration. The graphic satire of engravers James Gillray and George Cruikshank is replete with textual components that rely on the interaction of media for the overall satirical impact. Literary annuals combine engravings with the ekphrastic poetry of writers including William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Southey, and Letitia Elizabeth Landon. Book illustrations provided writers Sir Walter Scott and Alfred, Lord Tennyson a means to recycle previously published works as "new" texts; the engravings promote an illusion of textual originality and reality by imparting visual meanings onto the text. In turn, the close proximity of text to image changes visual meanings by making the images susceptible to textual meanings. Many of the theoretical implications resulting from the pairing of media resound in modern film adaptations, which often provide commentary about nineteenth-century visual culture and the self-reflexivity of media. The critical heritage that has responded to the pairing of media in nineteenth-century print culture often expresses uneasiness with the relationship between text and mechanically produced images, and this uneasiness has often resulted in the treatment of text and image as separate components of multi-media works. "Image and Text" recovers the dialogue between media in nineteenth-century print forms often overlooked in critical commentary that favors the study of an elusive and sometimes fictional concept of an original work; each chapter acknowledges the collaborative nature of the production of multi-media works and their ability to promote textual newness, originality (or the illusion of originality), and (un)reality. Multi-media works challenge critical conventions regarding artistic and authorial originality, and they enter into battles over fidelity of meaning. By recognizing multi-media works as part of a diverse genre it becomes possible to expand critical dialogue about such works past fidelity studies. Text and image cannot faithfully represent the other; what they can do is engage in dialogue: with each other, with their historical and cultural moments, and with their successors and predecessors.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectnineteenth-century print cultureen_US
dc.subjectekphrasisen_US
dc.subjectgraphic satireen_US
dc.subjectbook illustrationen_US
dc.subjectfilm adaptationen_US
dc.subjectSir Walter Scotten_US
dc.subjectLetitia Elizabeth Landonen_US
dc.subjectJames Gillrayen_US
dc.subjectliterary annualsen_US
dc.subjectGeorge Cruikshanken_US
dc.subjectAlfred, Lord Tennysonen_US
dc.subjectengravingen_US
dc.subjectCharles Heathen_US
dc.subjecttext and imageen_US
dc.titleImage and Text in Nineteenth-century Britain and Its After-imagesen_US
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberEgenolf, Susan B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRosner, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBouton, Cynthiaen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record