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dc.contributor.advisorHoyle, John R.en_US
dc.creatorSheldon, George H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-15T00:15:02Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-23T21:46:04Z
dc.date.available2010-07-15T00:15:02Zen_US
dc.date.available2010-07-23T21:46:04Z
dc.date.created2009-12en_US
dc.date.issued2010-07-14en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-12-7352en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between leadership responsibilities of Title I principals and student achievement. This study involved the analysis of the results of a 92 item survey sent to successful Title I principals. The 92 items were grouped into 21 leadership responsibilities, first and second order change. The first research question was an examination of the relationship between the 21 leadership responsibilities of Title I principals and student achievement. The overall indication is that a substantial relationship exists between the 21 Leadership responsibilities and combination reading and math averages. Fourteen leadership responsibilities were positively correlated to the overall achievement ranging from Input with r s = .169 to Focus with r s = .018. This indicates principals of successful Title I schools are proactive with their leadership which increases student overall achievement. The second research question was an examination of the most influential 21 leadership responsibilities of Title I schools student achievement in math and reading. The indication of influence of the 21 Leadership responsibilities and math was that a strong correlation does not exist. There are seven positively correlated leadership responsibilities ranging from r s = .103 to r s = .014 indicating student achievement is more affected by the educational conduct within the classroom compared to leadership of the principal (outside the classroom). There was a strong relationship between the leadership responsibilities and reading, with all 21 Leadership responsibilities being positively correlated. This indicates student achievement is dependent on the leadership of the principal to create a school or campus wide effort. The third research question was an examination of the relationship between the 21 leadership responsibilities and student achievement based on school size and demographics. The overall indication is that a relationship exists between student achievement and size of the school (r s = .187), math and population (r s = .234) and a particularly small correlation between reading and population (r s = .045). This finding suggests that the size of the school does matter with regard to overall (math and reading combined) and math student achievement of Title I schools.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.subjectprincipal leadershipen_US
dc.subjectstudent achievementen_US
dc.subjecttitle Ien_US
dc.titleThe Relationship Between the Leadership Responsibilities of Title I School Principals and Student Achievementen_US
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Administration and Human Resource Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCollier, Virginaen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberTorres, Marioen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWelch, Benen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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