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dc.creatorFleming, Erin Eliseen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:41:07Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:41:07Z
dc.date.created2002en_US
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2002-Fellows-Thesis-F559en_US
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves ).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Victorian ideology of separate spheres made an evident separation according to gender. The principle not only affected the interaction between men and women but also the spaces that they occupied. While men had access to universities and a range of professions, social advancement for women was through a favorable marriage and the accomplishments of her husband and children. Indeed, wives were venerated as "angels of the home," and their familial duties were thought to be sacred. However, during the fin de sic̈le, a resistance to this traditional separation of gender emerged in British society and literature. In March 1894, the term "New Woman" was first used in Sarah Grand's essay, "The New Aspect of the Woman Question." The concept of the New Woman was that she rejected traditional gender roles and demanded the emancipation of women. Scores of women began writing novels and short stories, knows as New Woman fiction, in addition to articles and essays demanding emancipation for women in the suffrage movement, the enfranchisement of marriage, and the double standard of sexuality between men and women. Most scholarly research regards the New Woman as a transitional figure that transcends the boundary between what is private and whit is public. Critics focus on the move of emancipated women from the domestic realm into the public sphere of education or the professions. I, however, am examining the depiction of the private life of the New Woman figure in turn-of-the-century literature. I wish to find out what impact, if any, the New Woman ideals had on domesticity and the portrayal of domestic life in literature. I plan to argue that the New Woman novels try to put what is locked in and what is locked out together and that the New Woman figure attempts to alter space in order to take apart and transcend the system of separate spheres to find a room of her own.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en_US
dc.subjectart and literature 2.en_US
dc.subjectMajor art and literature 2.en_US
dc.titleThe unlocked home: new women, new novels, new spacesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentart and literature 2en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineart and literature 2en_US
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen_US


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