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dc.creatorYborra, S. C.en_US
dc.creatorSpears, J. W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-16T16:23:54Z
dc.date.available2008-05-16T16:23:54Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-HH-00-05-41en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/6812
dc.description.abstractLighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used for simulating a case study building with motion sensors installed and the monitoring of system on-off statistics related to occupant patterns. It also describes the development of the Monte Carlo model used to predict the on-off status of sensors. The building using the motion sensors is compared to a building that controls the lights and ventilators by a conventional pre-programmed schedule. The conventional methods of simulation were shown to generate misleading information regarding electric demand charges and life-cycle costs of the building. When comparing to actual use patterns, the Monte Carlo process was shown to represent an adequate way to represent the on-off patterns. Computer simulations further demonstrate the potential life cycle cost savings from the use of the motion sensors.en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.titleField-Evaluation of Alternative HVAC Strategies to Meet Ventilation, Comfort and Humidity Control Criteria at Three Full-Serve Restaurantsen_US
dc.contributor.sponsorTexas A&M Universityen_US


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