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dc.creatorCollier, Meghan Ann
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-23T20:57:09Z
dc.date.available2020-07-23T20:57:09Z
dc.date.created2018-12
dc.date.issued2018-05-01
dc.date.submittedDecember 2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/188529
dc.description.abstractLanguage and control in children’s literature is a major topic of discussion within the field of children’s literature. While the full extent of the effects of children’s literature on shaping children’s worldviews is unknown, there is stress on the importance of being aware of what values texts pass to children, particularly the more subtle values of which the author may not be aware he or she is creating. As an epic originally created for an adult audience that now has numerous adaptations for children, the epic of Beowulf has a unique opportunity to contribute to the understanding of this passing on of values. By examining how morality is adapted for children from the original story of Beowulf, I bring awareness to what has been altered in the children’s versions in order create a story meant for children. This study of Beowulf brings to light how subtle alterations can significantly change the message within a story, expressing much different ideologies than the original in some most likely unintended ways, harming the value of the narrative and possibly the reader as well.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectBeowulf
dc.subjectAdaptations
dc.subjectChildren's literature
dc.titleRecreating Values: Morality in Adaptations of Beowulf for Children
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentEnglish
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorUndergraduate Research Scholars Program
thesis.degree.nameBA
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduate
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMize, Britt
dc.type.materialtext
dc.date.updated2020-07-23T20:57:09Z


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