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dc.creatorGriffin, James M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-17T17:43:32Z
dc.date.available2020-01-17T17:43:32Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/187061
dc.descriptionAn earlier Takeaway focusing on 2010 showed the necessity of state and federal subsidies to support the adoption of residential solar rooftops. Back then, the environmental bang for the buck was poor. But now, steeply falling solar costs have changed the picture. As before, this update looks not only at the costs and benefits to the solar adopters, but also to the investor-owned electric utilities, to the government, and to the environment. Cost reductions in solar panels now make subsidies unnecessary, but electric utilities continue to face a difficult situation. The author argues that wo big policy changes are needed.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics & Public Policy
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume 11;Issue 1
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectrooftop solaren
dc.subjectCalifornia electricity regulationen
dc.titleCalifornia’s Solar Rooftop Experience: An Updateen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.sponsorBush School of Government and Public Service
local.departmentOtheren


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  • The Takeaway
    Policy Briefs from the Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics, and Public Policy

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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States