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dc.contributor.advisorLinton, Thomas L.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorWardle, William J.en_US
dc.creatorMartin, Jennifer Lynnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-09-30T01:44:58Z
dc.date.available2004-09-30T01:44:58Z
dc.date.created2003-08en_US
dc.date.issued2004-09-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/179
dc.description.abstractThe effect of cattle grazing on the abundance and distribution of vegetation, burrowing crabs (Uca rapax, Uca pugnax, and Sesarma cinereum), marsh periwinkles (Littoraria irrorata), horn snails (Cerithidea pliculosa), and salt marsh snails (Melampus bidentatus) was evaluated over four seasons (summer 2000, fall 2000, winter 2001, and spring 2001) in grazed and ungrazed treatments. A Galveston Island salt marsh adjacent to Snake Island Cove was sampled at five elevations, from the water's edge to the high tidal flats. Data were analyzed for statistical differences using a two-way ANOVA in SAS. Cattle grazing may affect the vegetation and macroinvertebrate communities in salt marshes through trampling and herbivory. Vegetation resources available to other herbivores are decreased by the direct consumption of plant material by cattle. Spartina alterniflora and Salicornia virginica heights were significantly greater in ungrazed treatments than grazed for every season in the edge, upper, and middle elevation zones. Total aerial vegetative cover was also reduced significantly in grazed treatments, with the greatest impact in the edge and upper marsh. In the ungrazed treatments, S. alterniflora stem density was significantly greater in edge elevations, while both S. virginica percent cover and stem density in the edge elevation was greater. Burrowing crab populations were greater in the upper marsh and edge habitat of ungrazed treatments, while significantly greater in most of the middle marsh habitats of the grazed treatment. Size of burrowing crabs was generally significantly greater in ungrazed treatments. Cerithidea pliculosa size decreased in grazed treatments, but population had an overall increase in grazed treatments. Littoraria irrorata had very few differences between treatments, although few specimens were found. Melampus bidentatus populations were too small to evaluate thoroughly. Macroinvertebrate populations could be used to assess the overall health of grazed salt marshes.en_US
dc.format.extent465773 bytes
dc.format.extent168416 bytes
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.subjectgrazingen_US
dc.subjectsalt marshen_US
dc.subjectSpartina alternifloraen_US
dc.subjectSalicornia virginicaen_US
dc.subjectSalicornia bigeloviien_US
dc.subjectBatis maritimaen_US
dc.subjectUca rapaxen_US
dc.subjectUca pugnaxen_US
dc.subjectfiddler crabsen_US
dc.subjectSesarma cinereumen_US
dc.subjectmarsh craben_US
dc.subjectCerithidea pliculosaen_US
dc.subjecthorn snailen_US
dc.subjectLittoraria irrorataen_US
dc.subjectmarsh periwinkleen_US
dc.subjectMelampus bidentatusen_US
dc.subjectsalt marsh snailen_US
dc.titleThe effect of cattle grazing on the abundance and distribution of selected macroinvertebrates in west Galveston Island salt marshesen_US
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentWildlife and Fisheries Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineWildlife and Fisheries Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWebb, James W.en_US
dc.type.genreElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen_US


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