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dc.contributor.advisorBlake, Jamilia
dc.creatorWinters, Rebecca Rose
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-05T16:50:45Z
dc.date.created2017-08
dc.date.issued2017-07-03
dc.date.submittedAugust 2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/165750
dc.description.abstractStudies reveal that youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are at high risk of experiencing bully victimization in comparison to peers with and without disabilities. Yet, the association between ADHD subtypes and bully victimization is not well understood. The current study was undertaken to discover which set of behaviors related to ADHD subtypes is influential in determining whether students are victimized. Using a latent class growth analysis, students with ADHD in a nationally representative sample (n = 354) were grouped by victimization trajectory. Latent class analysis revealed four profiles. The majority of youth (45%) fell into a low victimization profile that remained stable over time. Approximately one-fourth of youth (26%) fell into a moderately high victimization profile that increased slightly over time. Nearly one-fifth (18%) experienced a moderately high level of victimization that decreased steeply across waves. The remainder (12%) were characterized by a low victimization profile that increased steeply over time. Hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention were examined as covariates in the latent class model. Students’ hyperactive-impulsive behaviors predicted latent class assignment. A secondary analysis examined English language proficiency as a predictor of victimization among youth with ADHD. English language learners were significantly less likely to experience victimization. This information may be used to reduce bully victimization among children with ADHD.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectBullying
dc.subjectPeer victimization
dc.subjectADHD
dc.titleBully Victimization among Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: The Longitudinal Influence of Behavioral Phenotypes
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychology
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M University
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRiccio, Cynthia
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBowman-Perrott, Lisa
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDixon, Quentin
dc.type.materialtext
dc.date.updated2018-02-05T16:50:45Z
local.embargo.terms2019-08-01
local.embargo.lift2019-08-01
local.etdauthor.orcid0000-0002-0012-7584


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