Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCARTER, NORVELLA
dc.contributor.advisorLewis, Chance
dc.creatorJames, Marlon C.
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-15T00:08:18Z
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-16T01:21:48Z
dc.date.available2010-01-15T00:08:18Z
dc.date.available2010-01-16T01:21:48Z
dc.date.created2008-12
dc.date.issued2009-05-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-3150
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to investigate the emerging school culture of Excel Academy for Boys [Pseudonym] located in the Southwestern region of the United States, and how it contributes to the social and academic development of urban African American male students. This case study was based on interviews and focus groups with parents, teachers, students, and the school administrator. Additionally, the researcher conducted participant observations of school meetings, new parent orientations, new teacher interviews, and reviewed student academic and behavioral records. This exploratory analysis consisted of two separate; but interrelated, qualitative studies relevant to educating urban African American males. The first inquiry featured a case study of Excel Academy for Boys, a singlegender middle school serving urban African American males. This detailed examination of Excel Academy’s organizational habitus yielded the Building African American Males Model. This organizational process was characterized by four essential factors that included: (1) educational justice; (2) expectations monitoring; (3) expectations casting; and (4) a culture of Effort. Particular attention was given to how each factor promoted community-school synergy or organizational synergy. These processes were essential for creating a school culture and climate that promoted the emotional, social, and academic maturation of students. Implications for protecting and strengthening the organizational habitus of Excel Academy were offered and broader implications for the emerging African American males’ school movement were discussed. The second study of Excel Academy uncovered four complexities that teachers, parents, and the school leader encountered as they sought to meet the social, emotional, and academic needs of urban African American males. These four critical complexities emerged through observations of the educational processes at Excel Academy, and were labeled: 1) expectations dissonance; 2) disguised engagement; 3) differential engagement, and 4) expectations overload. The emergence of each factor was detailed, and recommendations were offered to address each complexity.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectAfrican American urban malesen
dc.subjectsingle gender schoolsen
dc.titleEducation no longer deferred: the possibilities of educating urban african american males in a single gender school.en
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentTeaching, Learning, and Cultureen
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instructionen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHILL-JACKSON, VALERIE
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWEBB-JOHNSON, GWENDOLYN
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record