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dc.contributor.advisorBerridge, Robert I.
dc.creatorMitchell, Joseph Clovis
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-21T21:38:07Z
dc.date.available2020-08-21T21:38:07Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/DISSERTATIONS-399795
dc.descriptionTypescript (photocopy).en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which power and influence exists within the membership of selected community education advisory councils in Texas. In order to accomplish this purpose, the researcher sought answers to the following questions, utilizing as respondents, a population of advisory council members from selected communities: (1) Is there a relationship between advisory council power and the council's association with major power sources within the community when the community served has a Black population of 15% or more. (2) Is there a relationship between advisory council power and the council's association with major power sources outside the community when the community served has a Black population of 15% or more. (3) Is there a relationship between advisory council leadership and the council's access to resources and financial support when the community served has a Black population of 15% or more. The population targeted by the study consisted of 266 community education advisory council members from 17 school districts in Texas. The study used a seventy-eight item questionnaire. It contained sixty-four open-ended items and fourteen close-ended items and was designed following the classic models in power structure research. The respondents provided information regarding council member participation and involvement, membership in intra-community associations, member participation in extra-community associations, member political associations and member access to financial resources. Responses were converted into an index of power. Power was differenitated among (1) personal power, (2) power source associations inside the community, and (3) power source associations outside the community. Demographic information was used to enhance the index by including such useful information as longevity in the community. ...en
dc.format.extentxii, 151 leaves ;en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational Administrationen
dc.subject.classification1983 Dissertation M681
dc.subject.lcshAfrican Americansen
dc.subject.lcshEducationen
dc.subject.lcshTexasen
dc.subject.lcshCitizens' advisory committees in educationen
dc.subject.lcshTexasen
dc.titleCommunity education advisory councils : a profile of black leadership power in selected Texas communitiesen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.namePh. D. in Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctorialen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberErlandson, David A.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberFox, Milden J.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberStenning, Walter F.
dc.type.genredissertationsen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen
dc.publisher.digitalTexas A&M University. Libraries
dc.identifier.oclc13011976


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