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dc.creatorWagner, J. R.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-23T18:08:41Z
dc.date.available2011-04-23T18:08:41Z
dc.date.issued1984
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-84-04-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94744
dc.description.abstractMany powdered products are dried to their final moisture content by use of spray dryers. A basic spray dryer mixes an aqueous feedstock with heated air, vaporizing the water in the feedstock and producing the final dried powder in a single stage. Warm moist air is then exhausted to the surrounding environment. This paper discusses basic techniques available for recovering the energy in this exhaust air for use in preheating the spray dryer's inlet air. For illustration purposes the author describes an analysis performed at a milk products plant, where a spray dryer is used to produce powdered milk. Discussed approaches include air-to-air and air-liquid-air recuperates. Key issues include heat recovery potential, capital costs, overall payback, and space considerations. The potential for latent heat recovery is specifically addressed. Secondary issues are identified which can have an important influence on economics and technical approach at a specific site.en
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)
dc.subjectHeat Recoveryen
dc.subjectSingle Stage Spray Dryersen
dc.subjectRecovery Techniquesen
dc.subjectEconomic Analysisen
dc.titleAlternative Heat Recovery Options for Single-Stage Spray Dryersen
dc.contributor.sponsorMechanical Technology Incorporated


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