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dc.creatorBurns, A. B.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-07T22:17:01Z
dc.date.available2011-03-07T22:17:01Z
dc.date.issued1980
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-80-04-126
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/94012
dc.description.abstractRapidly increasing energy prices, as well as increasingly uncertain supplies, have caused some fundamental readjustments in the ways industrial corporations manage their energy use. Most manufacturing facilities and energy management procedures were designed at a time when energy and raw material costs were not significant contributors to plant and product costs. In order to stay competitive in the post-1973 environment, U. S. industry has had to make basic changes in those facilities and procedures. At Union Carbide, the initial response was to establish energy use and planning programs, centralize energy planning, and implement energy conservation programs. Second, we began a period of reexamining and revising those mechanisms, and of fully integrating energy use management into our basic operations and business planning. That process still continues today. Finally, we expect that, as energy takes a firm position as one of our most prominent operating factors -- along with labor, materials costs and capital availability -- we will need to rely less on formal structures and programs to manage it. It will become another significant responsibility of all line management, along with environmental concerns, OSHA, toxic substances control, waste disposal, and other new operating priorities.en
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)
dc.subjectEnergy Use Programsen
dc.subjectProgram Revisionen
dc.subjectBusiness Operation Mentalityen
dc.titleEnergy Use Management: One Company's Storyen
dc.contributor.sponsorUnion Carbide Corporation


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