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dc.creatorZickefoose, B.
dc.creatorTheising, T. R.
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-15T18:06:20Z
dc.date.available2010-06-15T18:06:20Z
dc.date.issued2001-05
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-01-05-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/90936
dc.description.abstractIn early 1998 Thomas R. Theising, BASF Corporate Engineering initiated the formation of a motor management team. The goal of the team was to develop a Motor Management Guideline to better manage the purchase and repair of motors used throughout the company. BASF draws a 240MW electrical power load. Accepting that 70% (industry standards range from 63 to 75% for BASF's businesses) of this load was consumed by rotating equipment and assuming an average cost of$401MWh at 8400 hours of annual operation BASF spends over $56M annually to operate electric motors. A guideline to better manage the purchase and repair of these motors could reduce this operating cost by 3 to 5%, which translates to $1.7M to $2.8M annually. An estimated total cost to BASF for implementation is $200K. The development of a Motor Management Guideline required the cooperative effort of a team of individuals. This team consisted of representatives from several BASF manufacturing locations, Corporate Engineering, Corporate Purchasing and Energy Management. Also, BASF included representatives from Duke Power and from Advanced Energy (AE). Advanced Energy had previously provided motor testing services to the BASF facility in Enka, NC.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)
dc.subjectMotor Management Guidelineen
dc.titleDeveloping a Motor Management Policy at BASFen
dc.typePresentationen


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