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dc.creatorHerrin, D.
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-27T16:47:35Z
dc.date.available2007-04-27T16:47:35Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.otherESL-IC-02-10-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/5170
dc.description.abstractInterval data is the “new found” backbone of both supply-side and demand-side programs. The ability to acquire utility interval data has been available for years but mostly used by utility companies and large commercial customers for billing and settlement purposes. Data acquisition is finally becoming a common practice outside the utility company arena to where it is recognized as a valuable asset and tool and is being required by building owners, facility engineers, ESCOs/ESPs and supply-side entities so they can accurately predict savings from an energy efficiency project, help mitigate performance contract (PC) risks, be used as a tool to negotiate better electricity rates in deregulated states, etc. One important aspect of data for a supply-side program is the value of aggregating interval data across an owner's building enterprise. If the buildings reside in a deregulated state, the aggregated data can be used as a tool to negotiate a better utility rate. The importance of data for a demand-side program is being able to evaluate and assess 15-minute load profile data for anomalies in whole building consumption and identify improper start-stop sequences for mechanical systems.en
dc.format.extent146879 bytesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)
dc.titlePractical Knowledge about Data: Acquisition, Metering, Monitoring, and Managementen


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