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dc.contributor.advisorFowler, Debra
dc.contributor.advisorHagan-Burke, Shanna
dc.creatorMacik, Maria Lazo
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-18T03:24:35Z
dc.date.available2020-08-01T06:38:53Z
dc.date.created2018-08
dc.date.issued2018-06-01
dc.date.submittedAugust 2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173729
dc.description.abstractIn higher education, modifications to curricula are common. Veterinary medical education scholarship in the area of curriculum renewal is relatively new, as it has primarily focused on course-level design, innovative teaching strategies, and the integration of skills into a curriculum. Recent calls for increased scholarship in this area have resulted in reports from veterinary medical education programs of their curricular renewal processes, achievements, and lessons learned. One program, in particular, from the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM) at Texas A&M University utilized the Program (Re)Design (PRD) model to redesign the first three, pre-clinical years of the four-year veterinary medical education curriculum. While recent papers on curricular change in veterinary medical education allude to factors that lead to successful curricular change and innovation, these papers do not necessarily focus on creativity as part of the curricular change process. This dissertation study aimed to identify evidence of creativity as CVM faculty redesigned the veterinary medical education curriculum using the PRD process. The researcher also used an existing model for organizational creativity to investigate the organizational stimulants and impediments to faculty creativity during the PRD process. The explanatory case study methodology was used as the primary research method. Emerging results suggest creativity was evident throughout, and as a result of, the curriculum redesign process. An analysis of the curriculum framework and meeting notes reveal data associated with both novelty and usefulness. Among focus group, interview, and documentary data, the researcher found evidence of both creative cognitive and affective aptitudes. Study findings also revealed several environmental factors that influenced CVM faculty creativity during the PRD process. Implications of the study are discussed as they relate to faculty development efforts and curriculum design in higher education. This dissertation concludes with an overview of study limitations and recommendations for future research.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectCurriculum redesignen
dc.subjectcreativityen
dc.subjectcurricular reformen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectfaculty developmenten
dc.subjectprogram redesignen
dc.titleGo Big or Go Home: A Case Study of Creativity in Curriculum Redesignen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A & M Universityen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLiew, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.committeeMemberViruru, Radhika
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWu, X. Ben
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.date.updated2019-01-18T03:24:35Z
local.embargo.terms2020-08-01
local.etdauthor.orcid0000-0002-6575-0473


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