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dc.creatorZhu, Xuemei
dc.creatorYu, Chia-Yuan
dc.creatorLee, Chanam
dc.creatorLu, Zhipeng
dc.creatorMann, George
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-11T22:34:00Z
dc.date.available2015-02-11T22:34:00Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationX. Zhu, C. Yu, C. Lee, Z. Lu, G. Mann, A retrospective study on changes in residents' physical activities, social interactions, and neighborhood cohesion after moving to a walkable community, Prev. Med., 66 (2014), pp. S93–S97.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/153704
dc.description.abstractObjective. This study is to examine changes in residents' physical activities, social interactions, and neighborhood cohesion after they moved to a walkable community in Austin, Texas. Methods. Retrospective surveys (N= 449) were administered in 2013–2014 to collect pre- and post-move data about the outcome variables and relevant personal, social, and physical environmental factors. Walkability of each resident's pre-move community was measured using the Walk Score. T testswere used to examine the pre–post move differences in the outcomes in the whole sample and across sub-groups with different physical activity levels, neighborhood conditions, and neighborhood preferences before the move. Results. After the move, total physical activity increased significantly in the whole sample and all sub-groups except those who were previously sufficiently active; lived in communities with high walkability, social interactions, or neighborhood cohesion; or had moderate preference for walkable neighborhoods.Walking in the community increased in the whole sample and all subgroups except those who were previously sufficiently active, moved from high-walkability communities, or had little to no preference for walkable neighborhoods. Social interactions and neighborhood cohesion increased significantly after the move in the whole sample and all sub-groups. Conclusion. This study explored potential health benefits of a walkable community in promoting physically and socially active lifestyles, especially for populations at higher risk of obesity. The initial result is promising, suggesting the need for more work to further examine the relationships between health and community design using pre–post assessments.en
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectWalkabilityen
dc.subjectCommunityen
dc.subjectNeighborhooden
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectSocial interactionen
dc.subjectSelf-selectionen
dc.titleA retrospective study on changes in residents' physical activities, socialen
dc.typeArticleen
local.departmentArchitectureen
local.departmentLandscape Architecture and Urban Planningen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.08.013


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