Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBednarz, Robert S.en_US
dc.creatorYoshikawa, Ayaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-14T22:20:10Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-16T16:18:33Z
dc.date.available2014-12-12T07:18:59Z
dc.date.created2011-12en_US
dc.date.issued2012-02-14en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10472en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the relationship between seniors' travel behaviors and living environments and the ways they successfully adapt to the environments, using a sequential mixed method in which qualitative methods follow quantitative analyses. The data were collected from the members of social clubs who regularly visit a community center for the elderly in a mid-size city in Osaka prefecture, Japan. One hundred ninety three seniors participated in the questionnaire survey asking about their daily travel patterns, personal backgrounds, social relations, and environmental information. Twenty-one seniors shared their perceptions of the city and the ways in which they get around through face-to-face interviews, sketch mapping, and one-week travel diary. The findings highlighted cultural and gender influences on seniors' mobility and the proactive nature of their travel behaviors. The participants were relatively healthy and active seniors who travel primarily by bicycle. The statistical analyses indicated that gender did not determine overall or average travel frequency but did identify factors related to high travel frequency. Living near a bus stop and the perception of going out more often than in the past predicted men's high travel frequency (going out every day), while women's high travel frequency was predicted by travel modes (bicycling and walking), sidewalk safety, chores (grocery shopping), and social network (seeing friends and having fewer relatives). Furthermore, the results of qualitative analyses revealed that seniors invented, modified, and applied various adaptive strategies to maintain or enhance their mobility. The positive perceptions of their communities such as favorable memories and beautiful scenery fostered seniors' familiarity and sense of belonging. Seniors used and modified social and environment resources to ensure travel safety. In addition, changes in senior's life stages and travel means manifested gender differences in their adaptive strategies. Men tended to focus on maintaining good health to keep their driver's license, representing their social role as a provider, while women's adaptations related to adjustment to widowhood and travel safety.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmobilityen_US
dc.subjectthe elderlyen_US
dc.subjectJapanen_US
dc.titleSenior Citizens' Adaptive Strategies to Get Around in Their Communities: A Case Study of Yao City, Japanen_US
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBednarz, Sarah W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSui, Daniel Z.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberUlrich, Roger S.en_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
local.embargo.terms2014-12-01en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record