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dc.contributor.advisorGuneralp, Incien_US
dc.contributor.advisorMillington, Andrew C.en_US
dc.creatorNyikos, Sarah Ildikoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-14T22:19:18Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-16T16:20:04Z
dc.date.available2014-01-15T07:05:33Z
dc.date.created2011-12en_US
dc.date.issued2012-02-14en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10232en_US
dc.description.abstractMeandering rivers and associated vegetation communities are highly dynamic systems that interact through various geomorphic and successional processes. However, much is still unknown about these interactions. Studies that focus on system integration rather than examining fluvial-related and vegetation dynamics individually will benefit science and the management of river systems. Tree communities in riparian areas, although consisting mainly of bottomland hardwood species, can be very diverse. Diversity has been linked to environmental influences such as meander migration, and changes in elevation and soil texture. This study focused on a single meander bend of the lower Trinity River in southeast Texas. The purpose of this research was to examine interactions between soil texture variation and the establishment and succession of riparian tree communities, as such interactions contribute to the formation of complex riparian landscapes. A bend-scale approach was utilized to provide a detailed study of vegetation pattern and of soil texture resulting from sedimentation processes, to examine for any relationships between them. Aerial imagery was used to assist in interpreting patterns of vegetation succession. The field portion of the study collected species and size class data on trees and soil samples for textural analysis. These data were analyzed separately to understand variations in tree communities and soils, but also together, to determine any relationships between soil texture and what tree communities are able to establish. Mean annual flow data from gauges upstream and downstream of the site were analyzed for changes in flow following dam construction upstream, as river regulation could potentially alter the vegetation establishment regime. Results showed five distinct communities or zones of vegetation. Soils on the site were strongly skewed toward finer sands and high silt and clay content. Zone locations and community structure were not directly related to soil texture; however, given species had clear relationships of relative density or dominance with specific soil textures. No changes in flow were noted between pre- and post- dam construction periods, indicating that the riparian system at this site may operate under near-natural conditions. Further studies in species-soil texture interactions, and for rare and invasive species in particular, may prove beneficial in improving understanding of the complex functioning of riparian systems and in providing valuable information for their management and restoration.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmeandering riversen_US
dc.subjectmeander migrationen_US
dc.subjectfluvial geomorphologyen_US
dc.subjectbiogeographyen_US
dc.subjectbiogeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjecttree communitiesen_US
dc.subjectvegetation patternen_US
dc.subjectsedimenten_US
dc.subjectsoil textureen_US
dc.subjectgrain sizeen_US
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.titleTree Community Patterns and Soil Texture Characteristics of a Meander Bend, Lower Trinity River, Southeast Texasen_US
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLafon, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGiardino, John R.en_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
local.embargo.terms2014-01-15en_US


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