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dc.contributor.advisorWattenbarger, Robert A.en_US
dc.creatorAlmarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-14T22:18:02Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-16T16:16:21Z
dc.date.available2012-02-14T22:18:02Zen_US
dc.date.available2012-02-16T16:16:21Z
dc.date.created2010-12en_US
dc.date.issued2012-02-14en_US
dc.date.submittedDecember 2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2010-12-8626en_US
dc.description.abstractShale gas formations are known to have low permeability. This low permeability can be as low as 100 nano darcies. Without stimulating wells drilled in the shale gas formations, it is hard to produce them at an economic rate. One of the stimulating approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient drainage from the formation matrix toward the hydraulic fracture. This flow could extend up to years of production and it can be identified by half slop on the log-log plot of the gas rate against time. It could be utilized to evaluate the hydraulic fracture surface area and eventually evaluate the effectiveness of the completion job. Different models from the literature can be used to evaluate the completion job. One of the models used in this work assumes a rectangular reservoir with a slab shaped matrix between each two hydraulic fractures. From this model, there are at least five flow regions and the two regions discussed are the Region 2 in which bilinear flow occurs as a result of simultaneous drainage form the matrix and hydraulic fracture. The other is Region 4 which results from transient matrix drainage which could extend up to many years. The Barnett shale production data will be utilized throughout this work to show sample of the calculations. This first part of this work will evaluate the field data used in this study following a systematic procedure explained in Chapter III. This part reviews the historical production, reservoir and fluid data and well completion records available for the wells being analyzed. It will also check for data correlations from the data available and explain abnormal flow behaviors that might occur utilizing the field production data. It will explain why some wells might not fit into each model. This will be followed by a preliminary diagnosis, in which flow regimes will be identified, unclear data will be filtered, and interference and liquid loading data will be pointed. After completing the data evaluation, this work will evaluate and compare the different methods available in the literature in order to decide which method will best fit to analyze the production data from the Barnett shale. Formation properties and the original gas in place will be evaluated and compared for different methods.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectShale gasen_US
dc.subjectproduction data analysisen_US
dc.titleThe Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formationen_US
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentPetroleum Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePetroleum Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSun, Yuefengen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberMaggard, Bryanen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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