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dc.contributor.advisorFERREIRA, MAURICIOen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCUNNINGHAM, GEORGE B.en_US
dc.creatorLee, Jae Deocken_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-12T22:31:20Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-14T16:01:13Z
dc.date.available2010-10-12T22:31:20Zen_US
dc.date.available2010-10-14T16:01:13Z
dc.date.created2009-08en_US
dc.date.issued2010-10-12en_US
dc.date.submittedAugust 2009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2009-08-3268en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this dissertation was to construct a customer-based cause-related sport marketing (CRSM) model and test the relationships among the proposed antecedents, consequences, and moderators. Three experimental studies were executed to achieve the research purpose. Study 1 aimed at examining how customers evaluate cause-related marketing (CRM) campaigns of team licensed products. A choice experiment (N=109) indicated that (a) a "social responsible" feature was the second most important attribute for choosing a baseball cap, (b) a low-fit, but familiar, CRM program was preferred to a high-fit, but unfamiliar, program, and (c) fan identification moderated the impact of sport/cause fit on students' choice of team licensed products. Study 2 investigated the impact of personality and gender on consumer attitudes toward CRSM programs. A 2 (sport/cause fit) x 2 (motivation) within subject experiment (N=86) found that (a) both sport/cause fit and motivation engaging in CRSM significantly affected consumer attitudes toward CRSM, (b) females showed more positive attitudes toward CRSM programs, and (c) Agreeableness was positively related to consumer attitudes toward CRSM but Neuroticism was negatively associated. Study 3 centered on the direct and moderating effects of fan identification and organizational identification on consumer attitudes toward CRSM programs using intercollegiate sport as a context. A two-group (high vs. low-fit CRSM messages), between subject, and post-test only experiment (N=309) denoted that (a) respondents showed more positive attitudes toward high-fit CRSM messages, (b) both fan identification and organizational identification moderated the effects of sport/cause fit on attitudes, and (c) positive attitudes increased purchase intentions on the cause-related products. To sum up, the three experimental studies support the relationships among antecedents, consequences, and moderators proposed in the customer-based causerelated sport marketing model. Theoretical and practical contributions are discussed. Finally, several limitations and future research directions are also established.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectCause-Related Marketingen_US
dc.subjectSportsen_US
dc.subjectConsumer Behavioren_US
dc.titleCause-Related Sport Marketing and Its Effects on Consumer Behavioren_US
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentHealth and Kinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineKinesiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSINGER, JOHN N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGRESHAM, LARRYen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US


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