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dc.creatorPahlka, Raymond Bentonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-07T23:17:20Z
dc.date.available2012-06-07T23:17:20Z
dc.date.created2002en_US
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2002-THESIS-P22en_US
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 75-80).en_US
dc.descriptionIssued also on microfiche from Lange Micrographics.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this research were threefold. The first objective was to develop a protocol for unbiased microinjection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow to normal fibroblast and epithelial cell lines. I determined the optimal equipment parameters as well as optimal cell conditions for effective, repeatable studies using the microinjection protocol. The second objective was to determine whether or not the AG1522 cell line exhibited gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) through microinjection of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow. A resolution was reached and these studies indicate that the AG1522 cell line does not exhibit GJIC on the basis of Lucifer Yellow microinjection. The third objective entailed determining to what extent neighboring Clone 9 cell colonies in contact with each other affected GJIC. These studies indicate a hierarchy of gap-junction communication ranging from negligible communication in single cell colony-to-colony boundaries to maximal communication in confluent cell monolayers. To better characterize the communication in these Clone 9 cells, I compared experimental data of dye concentrations in confluent monolayers as functions of time and distance away from the injected cell to two different analytical solutions of the diffusion equation. I found that the experimental data correlated well with one solution and thus calculated a corresponding diffusion coefficient of 68 []m²/sec. Investigations and observations of some experimental anomalies were discussed and future investigations concerning the effects of ionizing radiation on gap-junction expression using various assays of GJIC were proposed.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en_US
dc.subjecthealth physics.en_US
dc.subjectMajor health physics.en_US
dc.titleGap junction intercellular communication: a microinjection investigation of fibroblast and epithelial cell linesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinehealth physicsen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.type.genrethesis
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen_US


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