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dc.creatorWilliamson, Jessica Lynne
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:39:45Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:39:45Z
dc.date.created2002
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2002-Fellows-Thesis-W3512
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 13-15).en
dc.description.abstractThe current experiment investigated facial recognition memory for own and other-race faces. Two variations (light-skin and dark-skin) were presented for the Black targets. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the effect of skin variations of Black targets, lineup type (target present vs. target absent), and confidence levels for identifications upon a White witnesses' memory. Ten white males therefore viewed a video staged event containing three male targets. The three targets consisted of a White male, Light-skin Black male, and Dark-skin Black male. After a 2-day interim, the male participants completed a facial recognition test consisting of six lineups each containing six color mug shots. A lineup type (target-present vs. target-absent) was presented for each racial category: White target-present; White target-absent; Light-skin Black target-present; Light-skin Black target-absent; Dark-skin Black target-present; Dark-skin target-absent. The hit rates (correct identification) and confidence level of a choice were measured for each lineup. An other-race effect was not established in this study. However, a significant difference occurred between the mean hit rates (correct identifications) for Dark-skin Black target-present lineups (DBpresent) and the mean hits for Dark-skin Black target-absent (DBabsent) lineups. This suggests that the darker the skin tone of a Black target, the less likely a White eyewitness is to identify the correct target in a target-present lineup. No other significant differences between groups were found.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en
dc.subjectpsychology II.en
dc.subjectMajor psychology II.en
dc.titleSkin tone of targets, lineup type, and confidence levels in cross-racial identificationen
thesis.degree.departmentpsychology IIen
thesis.degree.disciplinepsychology IIen
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen


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