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dc.creatorSparling, Dwain Lelanden_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:40:28Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:40:28Z
dc.date.created2001en_US
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2001-Fellows-Thesis-S69en_US
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaf 26).en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter King Abdullah II inherited the throne from King Hussein I at a very critical transition point in 1999, it became necessary for a study to rigorously examine the fundamental characteristics of each leaders' outlooks on the political realm. Additionally, it created a unique opportunity to gauge the effects of a leadership transition period on a leader's policy preferences, as well as the changes in direction for future political action in the region. This study utilized the Verbs In Context System to code six randomly selected texts from each leader to construct operational code indices for both Hussein and Abdullah during two time periods: continuous, sustained periods of leadership, and the year of rule either before or after the transition point (depending on which leader is being considered). Mean values for each leader were computed on nine operational code indices spanning both philosophical and instrumental beliefs: Nature of the Political Universe, Realization of Political Values, Predictability of Others, Control over Historical Development, Role of Chance, Approach to Goals, Pursuit of Goals, Timing of Action, and Utility of Means. Two-factor ANOVA tests checked for variation over time with respect to leader, time period, and any possible interaction between these factors. The resulting data sets show that, barring some differences in relation to the negative characterization of the political universe, both Hussein and Abdullah possessed a propensity toward very cooperative means in approaching the political arena. These operational codes did not vary across time and the leaders did not differ much from each other in their characterization of and action in the political environment. Overall, Hussein and Abdullah tested to be very similar to each other in operational codes, and we can expect Abdullah to pursue the policies that were begun by Hussein in an effort to preserve the moderate stance that the nation has historically taken with respect to the Middle East peace process.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en_US
dc.subjecteconomics and political science.en_US
dc.subjectMajor economics and political science.en_US
dc.titleA comparative analysis of operational codes for King Hussein I and King Abdullah IIen_US
thesis.degree.departmenteconomics and political scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineeconomics and political scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen_US


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