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dc.creatorSeyle, Daniel Conoren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:41:36Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:41:36Z
dc.date.created2000en_US
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2000-Fellows-Thesis-S495en_US
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 14-15).en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research on religious fundamentalism has focused on correlating fundamentalism with a number of personality variables. Religious fundamentalism has been associated with low religious quest, high right-wing authoritarianism, prejudice, and authoritarian styles of child raising. Research on cognitive variables associated with religious fundamentalism has shown that it is associated with reduced cognitive complexity and lower complexity of thinking in problem solving. The overall view which has developed, is one of religious fundamentalism as a very rigid structure of belief which emphasizes traditional interpretations and ways of viewing the world. It was the hypothesis of this study that this structure of belief would interfere in the ability to solve cognitive restructuring or insight problems, as these problems require flexibility in mental representation in order to be solved. Forty-four subjects were recruited from the Psychology 107 Subject Pool and were given the Altemeyer-Hunsberger religious fundamentalism scale and 10 cognitive restructuring problems. Analysis of the results using a Pearson's R show no significant results (r=.38). However, when graphed the data show interesting patterns of uniformly high scores in cognitive restructuring in those who scored low in religious fundamentalism, and very high variation in restructuring scores in those who scored high in religious fundamentalism. Possible reasons for this are addressed, and directions for future research are suggested.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en_US
dc.subjectpsychology 2.en_US
dc.subjectMajor psychology 2.en_US
dc.titlePatterns of belief and patterned thought: relationships between religious fundamentalism and cognitive restructuringen_US
thesis.degree.departmentpsychology 2en_US
thesis.degree.disciplinepsychology 2en_US
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen_US


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