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dc.creatorHan, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-22T20:41:47Z
dc.date.available2013-02-22T20:41:47Z
dc.date.created1998
dc.date.issued2013-02-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1998-Fellows-Thesis-H3612
dc.descriptionDue to the character of the original source materials and the nature of batch digitization, quality control issues may be present in this document. Please report any quality issues you encounter to digital@library.tamu.edu, referencing the URI of the item.en
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references: leaf 29.en
dc.description.abstractWith literally tons of biomass produced annually, a process that uses this waste as a feedstock would help reduce the problem of disposal. The MixAlco process is one that does just that. It converts biomass through anaerobic fermentation into volatile fatty acids, mixed alcohols, and ketones. These products can be used as raw chemicals or as fuel for their heating value. The process must be implemented on an industrial scale in order to obtain significant amounts of the products. The substrates evaluated in this study are municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge (SS), cotton gin trash (GT), and chicken manure (CM). The product concentrations obtained from using MSW and SS as the substrate were low compared to those obtained with GT and CM. Maximum product concentrations when using GT and CM at a temperature of 55₉C were 22 g of total acid/L with acetic acid constituting 78 % of the total acids. The Continuum Particle Distribution Modeling (CPDM) method is also applied to data collected for batch reactions. The model can accurately predict acid concentrations when excessive decomposition of the acid is not occurring. However, when liquid residence times are extended and the products decompose, the model does not accurately predict the decreasing product concentrations.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen
dc.rightsThis thesis was part of a retrospective digitization project authorized by the Texas A&M University Libraries in 2008. Copyright remains vested with the author(s). It is the user's responsibility to secure permission from the copyright holder(s) for re-use of the work beyond the provision of Fair Use.en
dc.subjectengineering I.en
dc.subjectMajor engineering I.en
dc.titleCharacterization and CPDM modeling of volatile fatty acid fermentation with cotton gin trash and chicken manrure as substratesen
thesis.degree.departmentengineering Ien
thesis.degree.disciplineengineering Ien
thesis.degree.nameFellows Thesisen
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduateen
dc.type.genrethesisen
dc.type.materialtexten
dc.format.digitalOriginreformatted digitalen


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