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dc.creatorBrown, M.
dc.creatorSikorski, M.
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-27T17:37:06Z
dc.date.available2010-07-27T17:37:06Z
dc.date.issued1994-04
dc.identifier.otherESL-IE-94-04-37
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/91866
dc.description.abstractThe most energy intensive operation in textile processing, accounting for almost sixty percent of the industry wide consumption, is drying. Drying is prevalent because water is the carrier for dye, size, and other finishes. Water has been preferred because it is abundant, low cost, and an almost universal solvent. However, tightened water and energy supplies and increased regulation of water and air pollution has caused the utility of many wet-processing operations to be questioned. One feasible alternative to wet-processing is the use of supercritical fluids, such as carbon dioxide, as the carrier. This option would eliminate water discharge and convective drying and could achieve improved energy efficiency. A description of textile processing using supercritical fluid and a cost comparison with conventional wet-processing and convective drying is presented.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en
dc.subjectTextile Dryingen
dc.subjectSupercritical Fluidsen
dc.subjectCost Comparisonen
dc.titleNovel Approaches to Conserve Energy in Textile Processing Through The Use Of Supercritical Fluidsen
dc.typePresentationen


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