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dc.creatorChen, Q.en_US
dc.creatorDeng, S.en_US
dc.creatorLi, H.en_US
dc.creatorXu, C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-12-01T00:55:20Z
dc.date.available2007-12-01T00:55:20Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.otherESL-IC-07-11-34en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/6234
dc.description.abstractCommercial kitchens usually require a large amount of ventilation air and high ventilation rates. Today's typical kitchens and dining facilities are often equipped with Make-up Air Fans (MAF) or dedicated Make-up Air Units (MUA) to make up about 50% to 80% of the total exhaust air through range hoods. Comparing with 8:00 am to 5:00 pm operation of general office building, dining facilities have distinct schedules in which internal loads are much more condensed during specific occupied periods, i.e. breakfast, lunch, and dinner hours. This paper demonstrates the Continuous Commissioning® (CC® process for commercial kitchens and dining facilities through two case studies on a university campus. It will discuss the problems encountered in the case study facilities and CC measures identified, as well as savings analysis and more generic lessons and CC practices on commercial kitchen and dining facilities.en_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M University (http://www.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.publisherEnergy Systems Laboratory (http://esl.tamu.edu)en_US
dc.subjectOutside Air Uniten_US
dc.subjectContinuous Commissioningen_US
dc.subjectCommercial Kitchensen_US
dc.subjectMakeup Air Uniten_US
dc.subjectDining Facilitiesen_US
dc.subjectHumidity Controlen_US
dc.titleContinuous Commissioning of Commercial Kitchen and Dining Facilities - Case Studyen_US


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