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dc.contributor.advisorCrooks, Richard Men_US
dc.creatorHeo, Jinseoken_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-25T20:02:32Z
dc.date.available2007-04-25T20:02:32Z
dc.date.created2005-12en_US
dc.date.issued2007-04-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/4688
dc.description.abstractMicrofluidic biosensors and bioreactors based on immobilized biomaterials are described in this dissertation. Photocrosslinkable hydrogel or polymeric microbeads were used as a supporting matrix for immobilizing E.coli or enzymes in a microfluidic device. This dissertation covers a microfluidic bioreactor based on hydrogel-entrapped E.coli, a microfluidic biosensor based on an array of hydrogel-entrapped enzymes, and a microfluidic bioreactor based on microbead-immobilized enzymes. Hydrogel micropatches containing E.coli were fabricated within a microfluidic channel by in-situ photopolymerization. The cells were viable in the hydrogel micropatch and their membranes could be porated by lysating agents. Entrapment of viable cells within hydrogels, followed by lysis, could provide a convenient means for preparing biocatalysts without the need for enzyme extraction and purification. Our results suggested that hydrogel-entrapped cells, immobilized within microfluidic channels, can act as sensors for small molecules and as bioreactors for carrying out reactions. A microfluidic biosensor based on an array of hydrogel-entrapped enzymes could be used to simultaneously detect different concentrations of the same analyte or multiple analyte in real time. The concentration of an enzyme inhibitor could be quantified using the same basic approach. Isolations of the microchannels within different microfluidic channels could eliminate the possibility of cross talk between enzymes. Finally, we characterized microfluidic bioreactors packed with microbead-immobilized enzymes that can carry out sequential, two-step enzyme-catalyzed reactions under flow conditions. The overall efficiency of the reactors depended on the spatial relationship of the two enzymes immobilized on the beads. Digital simulations confirmed the experimental results.en_US
dc.format.extent44180147 bytes
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTexas A&M Universityen_US
dc.subjectmicrofluidicsen_US
dc.subjectimmobilized biomaterialen_US
dc.subjectbioreactoren_US
dc.subjectbiosensoren_US
dc.titleCharacterization and applications of microfluidic devices based on immobilized biomaterialsen_US
dc.typeBooken
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorTexas A&M Universityen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBoyd, James Gen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCremer, Paul Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRaushel, Frank Men_US
dc.type.genreElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen_US


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