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dc.creatorCrannell, Zachary
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-11T14:20:59Z
dc.date.available2006-07-11T14:20:59Z
dc.date.issued2006-07-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3666
dc.description.abstractThe process of viral infection has been shown to be a tightly structured process that exerts precise control over the nucleus. By quantitatively documenting the dynamic nuclear changes in response to nuclear infection of cells suspended in a three-dimensional collagen matrix, an understanding of nuclear reorganization can be elucidated from the tissue. Tissues were cultured in vitro in three dimensional collagen matrices which act as scaffolding that mimics the native environment. The cells were then infected with cytomegalo virus (CMV) which was labeled with green fluorescent protein to allow identification of the virus. During viral infection, nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) was employed to nondestructively image the nuclear volume over time. Comparing changes in the nuclear volume with control values, we expected to identify several stages of nuclear reorganization that have previously been identified during infection of 2D tissue cultures. Once it has been demonstrated that NLOM can be successfully used to track dynamics of infection, multiple mutant fluorescent proteins can be used to track host, virus and immune response to viral infection.en
dc.format.extent350612 bytes
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjecttissue engineeringen
dc.subjectvirusen
dc.titleAnnexation of Interchromosomal Space During Viral Infection of 3D Tissue Matrixen
dc.type.genreThesisen
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen_US


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