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dc.creatorWelch, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-11T14:19:09Z
dc.date.available2006-07-11T14:19:09Z
dc.date.issued2006-07-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/3655
dc.descriptionGround-penetrating radar is used to investigate the construction methods of a prehistoric star-shaped mound on Tutuila Island, American Samoa.en
dc.description.abstractThe use of geophysical remote sensing techniques has been increasing for several decades. As this technology becomes increasingly affordable and accurate, more and more archaeologists are beginning to wonder how this emerging technology can complement traditional archaeological techniques. This thesis presents the results of a study using ground-penetrating radar in the mountain settings of American Samoa, a chain of volcanic islands in the South Pacific. Our results show that in American Samoa, ceremonial mound (i.e. star mound) construction details were easily seen in radar profiles. Ground penetrating radar has the potential to yield significant details about such mounds, with no physical impact to the site.en
dc.description.sponsorshipUndergraduate Research Scholars Programen
dc.format.extent1317612 bytes
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPolynesian archaeologyen
dc.subjectSubsurface prospectingen
dc.titleTHE USE OF GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR FOR ARCHAEOLOGY: DETERMINING SITE FORMATION PROCESSES AND SUBSURFACE FEATURES ON TUTUILA ISLAND, AMERICAN SAMOAen
dc.type.genreThesisen
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.format.digitalOriginborn digitalen_US


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